Last edited by Fera
Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

4 edition of Soviet Literary Culture in the 1970s found in the catalog.

Soviet Literary Culture in the 1970s

Anatoly Vishevsky

Soviet Literary Culture in the 1970s

The Politics of Irony

by Anatoly Vishevsky

  • 179 Want to read
  • 31 Currently reading

Published by Univ Pr of Florida .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Literary Criticism,
  • History and criticism,
  • Cultural studies,
  • Former Soviet Union, USSR (Europe),
  • Literary studies: from c 1900 -,
  • Russian,
  • c 1970 to c 1980,
  • Irony in literature,
  • 20th century,
  • Russian fiction,
  • Short stories, Russian

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages336
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8021520M
    ISBN 100813012260
    ISBN 109780813012261

    For example, in the Russian translation of Basil Liddell Hart's History of the Second World War pre-war purges of Red Army officers, secret protocol to the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact, many details of the Winter War, occupation of Baltic states, Soviet occupation of Bessarabia and Northern Bukovina, Allied assistance to the Soviet Union during the war, many other Western .   The captivating and heroic book, viewed as historically accurate but fiction nonetheless, was included in the Soviet school program for literature, but only after Fadeyev promised to rewrite Author: Alexandra Guzeva.

    This ambitious effort, driven by "directives for a new kind of children’s literature" to be "founded on the assumption that the 'language of images' was immediately comprehensible to the mass reader, far more so than the typed word," brought in a great many artists and designers such as Alexander Deineka, El Lissitzky, and Vladimir Lebedev, tasking them all with creating .   The Cold War. The tension between the United States and the Soviet Union, known as the Cold War, was another defining element of the World War II, Western leaders began to worry that.

      L iterature shaped the political culture of the Russia in which Vladimir Ilyich Lenin grew up. Explicitly political texts were difficult to publish . This book completes the author's study of the sociology of the literary process in Soviet Russia, begun in The Making of the State Reader: Social and Aesthetic Contexts of the Reception of Soviet Literature (Stanford, ). The history of the literary process of the Soviet era, understood as the living process of the clash of political and ideological aspirations and the Format: Hardcover.


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Soviet Literary Culture in the 1970s by Anatoly Vishevsky Download PDF EPUB FB2

A major part of the book is devoted to a corpus of writing never before treated critically: the ironic stories that appeared in the late s and the s in Soviet humor periodicals and in the humor pages of newspapers and : Anatoliĭ Vishevskiĭ. Anatoly Vishevsky.

Soviet Literary Culture in the s: The Politics of Irony. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, x, pp. $ cloth; $ paper. in Canadian-American Slavic StudiesAuthor: Adele Barker.

Soviet literary culture in the s: the politics of irony. [Anatoliĭ Vishevskiĭ] -- Hope and faith were in short supply among Soviet liberals by the late s.

Writing about the popular culture of the Soviet intellectual during the years of post-Stalinist thaw, Anatoly Vishevsky. In his volume Soviet Literary Culture in the s: The Politics of Irony, Anatoly Vishevsky sets out to explore the various means by which the disillusionment and despair over the aban- donment of hopes and ideals in the post-Stalinist thaw found expression in Soviet popular cul- ture beginning in the s and continuing on into the s.

The most important literary discovery of the s was writing of Mikhail Afanasievich Bulgakov (), earlier known for his staging of Gogol’s Dead Souls and the novel The White Guard (), where, unlike in majority of Soviet literature, the opponents of Soviet power in the Civil War were shown not as despiteful villains but as confounded people making a stand for the.

Ehrenburg branded much of Soviet literature as oversimplified, tiresomely didactic, and divorced from reality. He called for a return to civility Soviet Literary Culture in the 1970s book literary discourse and an end to book reviews which read like criminal accusations.

Soviet writers must, he insisted, "do everything possible to make our literature worthy of our great people.". In the s many of these books, as well as stories by foreign children's writers, were adapted into animation.

Soviet Science fiction, inspired by scientistic revolution, industrialisation, and the country's space pioneering, was flourishing, albeit in the limits allowed by censors. The novel's villains include Western culture and Zionism in general and several Soviet literary figures, who are pro trayed by characters with thin ly disguised surnames.

But after the government leadership changed, his works were not welcome anymore. He was expelled from the Union of Writers and was not able to receive his Noble Prize for Literature in Soon after, Solzhenitsyn was expelled from the Soviet Union along with all his works.

Soviet Literary Culture in the s: The Politics of Irony. By Anatoly Vishevsky Soviet Literary Culture in the s: The Politics of Irony By Anatoly Vishevsky Hope and faith were in short supply among Soviet liberals by the late s. Writing about the popular. This volume assembles the work of leading international scholars in a comprehensive history of Russian literary theory and criticism from to the post-Soviet age.

By examining the dynamics of literary criticism and theory in three arenas--political, intellectual, and institutional--the authors capture the progression and structure of Russian literary criticism and its 4/5(1). John Updike emerged as a major literary figure with his novel Rabbit Redux.

Reflections of the s experience also found roots in the literature of the decade through the works of Joyce Carol Oates and Wright Morris. With the rising cost of hardcover books and the increasing readership of " genre fiction ".

If you’re looking for a bitesize classic, this is the book to turn to. Written by Fyodor Dostoevsky, one of Russian literature’s giants, White Nights tell the story of two sleepless people who meet at the same spot every night.

It is a story of alienation and unreciprocated love set in the streets of 19th century St. : Marta Wiejak. The best books published during the 's decade ( - ). See also Most Rated Book By Year Best Fantasy Books of the s Best Mystery Books of the s Best Science Fiction Books of the s Best Books By Century: 21st, 20th, 19th, 18th, 17th, 16th, 15th, 14th, 13th, 12th, 11th, 10th, 9th, 8th, 7th, 6th, 5th, 4th Best Books by Decade.

Compiling a list of classic children’s books from the s was unexpectedly challenging. Most of the books I had previously read from this decade were already quite popular so I had to do a fair bit of research to decide which s titles to read so I could determine what I wanted to include.

- welcome to the wonderful world of soviet books. - this site attempts to catalogue the amazing books in english, hindi and other indian languages, published the soviet union (ussr). - many of these books are available for sale at reasonable prices. - these are the original books printed in s and s by mir, progress, and raduga publishers.

Samizdat, (from Russian sam, “self,” and izdatelstvo, “publishing”), literature secretly written, copied, and circulated in the former Soviet Union and usually critical of practices of the Soviet government.

Samizdat began appearing following Joseph Stalin’s death inlargely as a revolt against official restrictions on the freedom of expression of major dissident Soviet authors.

Post-Revolutionary literature Literature under Soviet rule. The Bolshevik seizure of power in radically changed Russian a brief period of relative openness (compared to what followed) in the s, literature became a tool of state ally approved writing (the only kind that could be published) by and large sank to a subliterary level.

avg rating —ratings — published — added bypeople. The roots of Soviet literary culture extend beyond the establishment of the Soviet state itself. Maxim Gorky's Mother written, ironically, some years before the Bolshevik Revolution in the United States (the country, it might be noted, that also contributed to the cause of the tradition of May Day observances) is one hallmark of that culture avant la : Maurice Friedberg.

Plus the Soviet Union started (and again, that's an official date of proper formation, like for the Warsaw Pact) but is arguably a real start date. Perhaps 'Science Fiction of (Former) Warsaw Pact Countries in the 20th Century' or 'Science Fiction of (Former) Warsaw Pact Countries ' or something.With the fall of the Soviet era, a new generation of Russian authors finally began to make their voices heard.

From thrillers, to science fiction novels, fantasy literature and political satire, numerous genres boomed in the ‘New Russia’ of the s.

Here are 12 contemporary Russian novels that should be on your reading : Varia Fedko-Blake.The most talked about events in the s were the Vietnam War, the Watergate scandal, the Iran hostage crisis, the energy crisis, and stagflation.

In the film Colossus a massive American defense computer, becomes sentient and assumes control of the world for the "good of mankind" during the Cold War to prevent World War III.